Israel-based Carbyne collects $15M to modernize emergency response systems

By Dave Muoio
Share

Carbyne, an Israeli firm looking to digitally update emergency response systems, has raised $15 million in Series B funding. The round was led by Elsted Capital Partners, with participation from strategic investor Founders Fund.

According to the announcement, Carbyne — which was founded in 2014 and is backed by former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak —will be using these new funds to build its presence in global markets and fuel R&D.

“People expect cutting-edge, highly effective services when it comes to emergencies and public safety,” Barak, who serves as the company’s chairman, said in a statement. “That is what makes Carbyne and its wide-ranging, advanced technologies so in demand. Their founders and the team are so creative, focused, and energetic that I’m confident that, with the entry of Founders Fund, a great future lies ahead for the company.”

Carbyne develops an end-to-end, digitized emergency response system designed to help emergency response personnel better handle incoming calls. According to the company, the system incorporates source-agnostic digital data collection tools, algorithm-driven information prioritization, a record management and call recording system, and an in-center call handling tool that automatically priorities voice and video calls based on caller location and other variables.

Earlier this month Carbyne announced that its was adopted by Fayette County, Georgia, and Ocean County, New Jersey. The company also claims to reduce dispatch times by 65 percent through deployment of its platform, and to have clients across Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.

“Founders Fund’s participation in this investment round is extremely significant,” Amir Elichai, founder and CEO of Carbyne, said in a statement. “Aside from the enormous pride we take in being their first investment in Israel, the value brought by such a fund — which helped build some of Silicon Valley’s legendary companies — is enormous. We are looking at a vast market with enormous potential and we’re only just scratching the surface. We couldn’t ask for a better partner for our team, this is only the beginning of our transformation of the global emergency communication ecosystem.”

Carbyne isn’t alone in revamping legacy emergency response systems. RapidSOS, for instance, has also recently enjoyed new funding for its internet of things-based approach to emergency data collection for responders.