Migraine apps unite in SensorRX's acquisition of Welltodo

By Laura Lovett
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In late June, patient data company SensorRX announced that it was set to acquire digital health company Welltodo, maker of the Migraine Coach app, for an undisclosed sum. 

Before the acquisition both companies had platforms that focus on helping people who live with migraines. As a result of the deal the companies are expected to integrate the two platforms immediately. 

"This is a win for migraine and chronic disease sufferers alike,” Chris Cardinal, cofounder and CEO of Welltodo, said in a statement. "SensorRX's partnerships with healthcare systems, resources, and talented leadership will move us toward our ultimate goal of leveraging data and technology to reduce the burden that chronic disease places on individuals' lives and on business' bottom line.”

St. Louis, Miss.-based Welltodo first launched Migraine Coach in 2015. The app uses algorithms to help people track their migraines, and also includes a predictive feature. 

Charlotte, N.C.-based SensorRX has its own migraine app called MigrnX, which was launched last year after being tested in the Carolinas Healthcare system. The app helps track a user’s migraine and various symptoms including intensity level, medication usage and effectiveness, and frequency. It also lets users record other health factors like menstrual cycles. The app then offers the user headache patterns and triggers. 

The platform also has the ability to integrate with a patient’s EHR and give a provider more context about a user's migraines. 

"We are excited to complete this acquisition soon and support the transition of Migraine Coach users," SensorRX CEO Tripp Winn said in a statement. "It's amazing what Chris Cardinal built with his team. This level of experience and leadership will be a great addition to the SensorRX organization.”

These aren’t the only companies that have specialized in treating headaches and migraines. Last October Mountain-View, Calif.-based Second Opinion Health released its first app called Migraine Alert, which gives personalized predictions of migraine episodes for people with intermittent migraines.